Cynthia E Irvine
Cynthia E Irvine 2015 Inductee for the
            Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at Naval Postgraduate School
Cynthia E. Irvine is a Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at the Naval Postgraduate School. Her research has focused on developmental security as applied to the creation of trustworthy systems, and more recently, on cyber operations. She is a champion of cyber security instruction designed to ensure that the foundational concepts of constructive cyber security are integrated into academic courses and curricula.

Through curriculum development, educational tools, the supervision of student research, and her professional activities, Dr. Irvine is a true leader in cyber security education.
Jerome H. Saltzer
Jerome Howard Saltzer 2015 Inductee for
                the Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Professor Emeritus of Computer Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Jerome H. Saltzer has been a faculty member at MIT since 1966, where his teaching and research interests have been about principles of computer system engineering. His involvement in cyber security began with the discovery in 1964 that it was surprisingly easy to break into the MIT Compatible Time-Sharing System.

He helped design the security aspects of the Multics time-sharing system and he led the development of a security kernel for Multics; later he led the development of the Kerberos single-login authentication system. His paper with Michael D. Schroeder "The Protection of Information in Computer Systems" collected a set of security principles that have been widely cited for four decades.
Ron Ross
Ron Ross 2015 Inductee for the Cyber Security
                Hall of Fame
Fellow, National Institute of Standards and Technology
Ron Ross is considered the “Father” of the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) security standards and recognized as one of the world’s leading experts on cyber security. He is the principal architect of the NIST Risk Management Framework and led the development of the first set of unified cyber security standards for the federal government, including the Department of Defense and the Intelligence Community.

Dr. Ross has received the NSA Scientific Achievement Award, Defense Superior Service Medal, Department of Commerce Gold and Silver Medals, and three Federal 100 Awards. He has been inducted into the Information Systems Security Association (ISSA) Hall of Fame and is an ISSA Distinguished Fellow.
Steven B. Lipner
Steven B. Lipner 2015 Inductee for the
                Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Retd Director of Software Security in Trustworthy Computing Security at Microsoft
Steven B. Lipner is recently retired as the Partner Director of Software Security in Trustworthy Computing Security at Microsoft and serves as a board member and chair of SAFECode. He led Microsoft’s Security Development Lifecycle team and was responsible for its corporate strategies and policies for supply chain security and for strategies related to government security evaluation of Microsoft products.

He is named as an inventor on 12 U.S. patents with two pending applications in the field of computer and network security, and is co-author of the book, The Security Development Lifecycle.
Susan Landau
Susan Landau 2015 Inductee for the Cyber
                Security Hall of Fame
Professor of Cybersecurity Policy in Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Susan Landau has been a twenty-year leader in the "Crypto Wars." Her books, Privacy on the Line: The Politics of Wiretapping and Encryption, co-authored with Whitfield Diffie, and Surveillance or Security? The Risks Posed by New Wiretapping Technologies, testimony in Congress, and technical and policy research have helped ensure the widespread availability of strong encryption.

Landau has been a long-term advocate for NIST's Computer Security Lab, including during her tenure on the Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board. She is a strong advocate for women in computer science, and has organized workshops for women students and young faculty. Landau is Professor of Cybersecurity Policy at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and has previously been a Senior Staff Privacy Analyst at Google and a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems.
Paul Kocher
Paul Kocher 2014 Inductee for the Cyber
            Security Hall of Fame
Designed SSL3 cryptographic elements
Paul Kocher designed the cryptographic elements of SSL3 back in the mid-1990s, while still an undergraduate at Stanford, thereby gaining him an international reputation for allowing secure Internet transactions.

The longevity of SSL3 is a testament to his brilliance, as is the fact that he is entirely self-taught in cryptography.
Vinton G. Cerf
Vinton G. Cerf 2014 Inductee for the Cyber
            Security Hall of Fame
VP & Chief Internet Evangelist - Google
Vinton G. Cerf is vice president and Chief Internet Evangelist for Google. He contributes to global policy development and continued spread of the Internet.

Widely known as one of the "Fathers of the Internet," Cerf is the co-designer of the TCP/IP protocols and the architecture of the Internet.
Philip R. Zimmermann
Philip R. Zimmermann 2014 Inductee for the
            Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Creator of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP)
Philip R. Zimmermann is the creator of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), the most widely used email encryption software in the world. He is also known for his work in VOIP encryption protocols, notably ZRTP and Zfone.
Steven M. Bellovin
Steven M. Bellovin 2014 Inductee for the
            Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Professor of Computer Science - Columbia University
Steven M. Bellovin is a professor of computer science at Columbia University, where he does research on networks, security, and especially why the two don't get along, as well as related public policy issues.

Bellovin is the co-author of Firewalls and Internet Security: Repelling the Wily Hacker, and holds a number of patents on cryptographic and network protocols.
Richard Alan Clarke
Richard Alan Clarke 2014 Inductee for the
            Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Served as Special Advisor to the President on cyber security
Richard Alan Clarke is the former National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism for the United States. Under President George W. Bush, he served as the Special Advisor to the President on cyber security.

Mr. Clarke developed and found sponsorship for legislation which created the Cyber Corps and lead the development of the first National Plan for Cyber Security.
David E. Bell
David E. Bell 2013 Inductee for the Cyber
                Security Hall of Fame
Co-author of the Bell-La La Padula model of computer security
Dr. Bell was the co-author of the Bell-La La Padula model of computer security (with Leonard J. La Padula). The model became the most widely used security model in the development of trusted (secure) computer systems.

His two papers “Lattices, Policies and Implementations” and “Putting Policy Commonalities to Work” showed not only that any Boolean policy could be supported by any Boolean-policy implementation, but also that every “different” security policy in the literature was a Boolean security policy, and hence supportable by any Boolean implementation.
Jim Bidzos
Jim Bidzos 2013 Inductee for the Cyber
                Security Hall of Fame
Jim Bidzos is CEO and Chairman of VeriSign, Inc
He served as CEO of RSA Data Security from 1986 through 1999. Along with RSA co-founder and MIT professor Ron Rivest, Bidzos built RSA into the premier cryptography company in the 80s and 90s.

Bidzos formed Verisign in 1995 to provide trusted certificate authority services to a global market after pioneering the concept within RSA beginning in 1986.He also created the RSA Conference in 1991, and was the Chairman of the event until his retirement from that position in 2004.
Eugene H. Spafford
Eugene H. Spafford 2013 Inductee for the
                Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Professor of CS @ Purdue University
Eugene H. Spafford is one of the most recognized leaders in the field of computing. Dr. Eugene Spafford is a professor with an appointment in Computer Science at Purdue University, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1987.

He is a senior advisor and consultant on issues of security and intelligence, education, and policy to a number of major companies, academic and government agencies, including Microsoft, Intel, Unisys, the US Air Force, the NSA, the GAO, the FBI, the NSF, the DoJ, the DoE, and two Presidents of the United States.
James Anderson
James Anderson 2013 Inductee for the Cyber
                Security Hall of Fame
Started the study of intrusion detection and "THE BRAIN TRUST"
The late James Anderson effectively started the field of intrusion detection, invented the concept of the reference monitor, made some very significant but classified contributions to counterintelligence, and organized some of the first cyber penetration teams, including a well-known group at CIA named "The Brain Trust".

Mr. Anderson originated the idea of contaminated media and loading an altered OS, the "2 card loader" issue, whose intellectual successor is such things as Stuxnet, APTs, and arguably was the first computer virus. In 1990, Mr. Anderson was one of the first recipients of the National Computer Systems Security Award.
Willis H. Ware
Willis H. Ware 2013 Inductee for the Cyber
                Security Hall of Fame
Computer Scientist emeritus at RAND Corporation
The late Willis H. Ware (Ph.D., Princeton University, 1951) was a senior computer scientist emeritus with the RAND Corporation. An electrical engineer, he devoted his career to hardware, software, architectures, software development, networks, federal agency and military applications, management of computer-intensive projects, public policy and legislation.

Dr. Ware was a member of the NAE, a Fellow of the IEEE, AAAS,and ACM. He received the U.S. Air Force Exceptional Civilian Service Medal (1979), the IEEE Centennial Medal (1984), the National Computer System Security Award (1989), and the IEEE Computer Pioneer Award (1993).
F. Lynn McNulty
F. Lynn McNulty 2012 Inductee for the Cyber
            Security Hall of Fame
An early champion of Information Security in the Government
F. Lynn McNulty, an early champion of information security in the government, passed away on June 4. McNulty, whom Federal Computer Week identified as one of the key thought leaders of the past 25 years in a feature package that will appear in the June 15 issue, spent 30 years in the government.

Over the span of his federal career he served as the State Department’s first director of information systems security; as security program manager at the Federal Aviation Administration; and as associate director for computer security at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
Martin Hellman
Martin Hellman 2012 Inductee for the Cyber
            Security Hall of Fame
Professor Emeritus - Stanford University
Professor Hellman is best known for his invention, with Diffie and Merkle, of public key cryptography. In addition to many other uses, this technology forms the basis for secure transactions on the Internet.

He has also been a long-time contributor to the computer privacy debate, starting with the issue of DES key size in 1975 and culminating with service (1994-96) on the National Research Council's Committee to Study National Cryptographic Policy, whose main recommendations have since been implemented.
Ralph Merkle
Ralph Merkle 2012 Inductee for the Cyber S
            ecurity Hall of Fame
Developed earliest public key cryptography system with Diffie and Hellman
Merkle developed the world's earliest public key cryptographic system. Their insight underpins secure transactions on the Internet, enabling e-commerce and a host of other interactions in which secure electronic communications are required.

Since 1988, Merkle has been researching nanotechnology and, in 2003, became a distinguished professor at Georgia Tech before returning to California in 2006.He has been awarded the RSA Award in Mathematics (2000) and the IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal (2010).
Whitfield Diffie
Whitfield Diffie 2012 Inductee for the
            Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Developed the world's earliest public key cryptographic system along with Merkle and Hellman
Diffie and Hellman worked together throughout 1975 and were joined by Ralph Merkle in 1976. The results of their work appeared in Diffie and Hellman's paper, New Directions in Cryptography, in November 1976. The insights in this paper underpin secure transactions on the Internet, enabling e-commerce and a host of other interactions in which secure electronic communications are required.

In 1992, Diffie was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, and in 2010, shared the IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal with Ralph Merkle and Martin Hellman.
Dorothy Denning
Dorothy Denning 2012 Inductee for the Cyber
            Security Hall of Fame
Dorothy Denning is recognized as one of the world's leading experts in information security.
She is currently a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Defense Analysis at the Naval Postgraduate Schoolin Monterey, CA, and is one of the faculty associated with the Center on Terrorism and Irregular Warfare and with the Center for Information Systems Security Studies and Research.

Dr. Denning has published 150 articles and four books, her most recent being Information Warfare and Security. She has been named to the ISSA Hall of Fame (2003), awarded the CSO COMPASS award (2003), named as both a CISSP and as a CISM honoris causa, and elected as a Fellow of the ACM (1995).
Roger Schell
Roger Schell 2012 Inductee for the Cyber
            Security Hall of Fame
President of ESec, providing platforms for secure, reliable e-business on the Internet
Dr. Schell was co-founder and Vice President for Engineering of Gemini Computers, Inc., where he directed development of Gemini's Class A1 network processor commercial product. He was also the founding Deputy Director of the (now) National Computer Security Center. Previously he was an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the Naval Postgraduate School.

He has been referred to as the "father" of the Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria (the "Orange Book"). The NIST and NSA have recognized Dr. Schell with the National Computer System Security Award.
Peter Neumann
Peter Neumann 2012 Inductee for the Cyber
            Security Hall of Fame
SRI Computer Science Lab since September 1971
In the Computer Science Laboratory at SRI he led the Provably Secure Operating System (PSOS) project, under which the SRI Hierarchical Development Methodology (HDM) was created.

Dr. Neumann’s main research interests continue to involve security, crypto applications, overall system survivability, reliability, fault tolerance, safety, software-engineering methodology, systems in the large, applications of formal methods, and risk avoidance. He has written numerous papers, given many talks, and has provided testimony before government hearings. He recently published a book Computer Related Risks (ACM Press, 1995).
Carl Landwehr
Carl Landwehr 2012 Inductee for the Cyber
            Security Hall of Fame
Lead Research Scientist - CSPRI at George Washington University
Dr. Landwehr is a noted expert in trustworthy computing, including high assurance software development, understanding software flaws and vulnerabilities, token-based authentication, system evaluation and certification methods, multilevel security, and architectures for intrusion tolerant systems

He has been a leader in cybersecurity research, having led cybersecurity programs at the National Science Foundation from 2001-2004 and 2009-2011, overseeing the disbursement of more than $110M of grants, and having served as a division chief at IARPA from 2005-2009.
Ronald L.Rivest
Ron Rivest 2012 Inductee for the Cyber Security
            Hall of Fame
Professor of Computer Science at MIT's EECS Department
He is the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor of Computer Science at MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and a member of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)

Rivest is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery, the International Association for Cryptologic Research, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Adi Shamir
Adi Shamir 2012 Inductee for the Cyber Security
            Hall of Fame
Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science at the Weizmann Institute
. He is a co-inventor of the RSA algorithm (with Ron Rivest and Len Adleman), a co-inventor of the Feige–Fiat–Shamir identification scheme (with Uriel Feige and Amos Fiat), one of the inventors of differential cryptanalysis and has made numerous contributions to the fields of cryptography and computer science

In addition to RSA, Shamir's other numerous inventions and contributions to cryptography include the Shamir secret sharing scheme, the breaking of the Merkle-Hellman knapsack cryptosystem, visual cryptography, and the TWIRL and TWINKLE factoring devices.

Shamir has also made contributions to computer science outside of cryptography, such as finding the first linear time algorithm for 2-satisfiability and showing the equivalence of the complexity classes PSPACE and IP.
Leonard Adleman
Leonard Adleman 2012 Inductee for the Cyber
            Security Hall of Fame
Theoretical computer scientist and Prof. of CS and Mol.Biol. at the USC.
He is known for being a co-inventor of the RSA (Rivest-Shamir-Adleman) cryptosystem in 1977, and of DNA computing. RSA is in widespread use in security applications, including https.

For his contribution to the invention of the RSA cryptosystem, Adleman, along with Ron Rivest and Adi Shamir, has been a recipient of the 1996 Paris Kanellakis Theory and Practice Award and the 2002 ACM Turing Award, often called the Nobel Prize of Computer Science. He is one of the original discoverers of the Adleman-Pomerance-Rumely primality test. Fred Cohen, in his 1984 paper, Experiments with Computer Viruses has credited Adleman with coining the term "virus".
Mike Jacobs
Mike Jacobs
Chairman - National Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Mr. Jacobs was the first Information Assurance (IA) Director at the National Security Agency (NSA). Under his leadership, NSA began implementing an Information Assurance strategy to protect the Defense Information Infrastructure and as appropriate, the National Information Infrastructure.

He served as the Deputy Associate Director for Operations, Military Support where he was responsible for developing a single and coherent military support strategy for NSA.
Richard Alan Clarke
Richard Alan Clarke 2014 Inductee for the
            Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Served as Special Advisor to the President on cyber security
A 2014 inductee into the Hall of Fame,Richard Alan Clarke is the former National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection, and Counter-terrorism for the United States. Under President George W. Bush, he served as the Special Advisor to the President on cyber security.

Mr. Clarke developed and found sponsorship for legislation which created the Cyber Corps and lead the development of the first National Plan for Cyber Security.
Eugene H. Spafford
Eugene H. Spafford 2013 Inductee for the
                Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Professor of CS @ Purdue University
A 2013 inductee into the Hall of Fame,Eugene H. Spafford is one of the most recognized leaders in the field of computing. Dr. Eugene Spafford is a professor with an appointment in Computer Science at Purdue University, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1987.

He is a senior advisor and consultant on issues of security and intelligence, education, and policy to a number of major companies, academic and government agencies, including Microsoft, Intel, Unisys, the US Air Force, the NSA, the GAO, the FBI, the NSF, the DoJ, the DoE, and two Presidents of the United States.
David E. Bell
David E. Bell 2013 Inductee for the Cyber
                Security Hall of Fame
Co-author of the Bell-La La Padula model of computer security
A 2013 inductee into the Hall of Fame,Dr. Bell was the co-author of the Bell-La La Padula model of computer security (with Leonard J. La Padula). The model became the most widely used security model in the development of trusted (secure) computer systems.

His two papers “Lattices, Policies and Implementations” and “Putting Policy Commonalities to Work” showed not only that any Boolean policy could be supported by any Boolean-policy implementation, but also that every “different” security policy in the literature was a Boolean security policy, and hence supportable by any Boolean implementation.
Robert Bigman
Robert Bigman
Retd. CIA Official and current President of 2BSecure LLC
Robert Bigman recently retired from Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), after serving a thirty year distinguished career. Recognized as a pioneer in the field of classified information protection, Mr. Bigman developed technical measures and procedures to manage the nation’s most sensitive secrets. As an information security trailblazer, Mr. Bigman participated in developing security measures for Government computers well before commercial industry found the Internet.

Mr. Bigman has received numerous CIA and Director of National Intelligence awards. Mr. Bigman is now an independent cyber security consultant and president of 2BSecure LLC in Bethesda, Maryland.
Gordon W. Romney
Gordon Romney
University Professor of Cyber Security – National University, San Diego
Founder of ARCANVS, Inc. the first health care Certification Authority, and creator of US and international patents for PKI and e-commerce, most noted of which is the DeID patent for maintaining the confidentiality of PII data. He was the architect of the National University CAE-IAE MS in Cyber Security and IA program that provisions virtual security labs.

Romney has been instrumental in the development of the San Diego Cyber Harbor through Securing Our eCity, The Security Network, Cyber Hive/Tech, San Diego Cyber Center of Excellence and Cyber Security Institute of San Diego.
John Serafini
John Serafini
Early Stage Venture Capital Investor
John Serafini is an early stage venture capital investor and start-up company builder with Allied Minds where he focuses upon the commercialization of technologies originating from U.S. federal research institutions with sector concentration upon dual-use cybersecurity, mobility, artificial intelligence technologies.

A former Airborne Ranger-qualified U.S. Army infantry officer with duty stations at the 82d Airborne Division and the Korean DMZ, John earned a B.S. degree with highest honors from the United States Military Academy at West Point, an MBA degree from the Harvard Business School, and an MPA degree from the Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government.
Donna F. Dodson
Donna F. Dodson
Chief Cybersecurity Advisor for the National Institute of Standards and Technology
Donna F. Dodson is the the Chief Cybersecurity Advisor for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). She is also the Director of NIST’s National Cybersecuity Center of Excellence (NCCoE).

Donna oversees ITL’s cyber security program to conduct research, development and outreach necessary to provide standards, guidelines, tools, metrics and practices to protect the information and communication infrastructure. This includes collaborations with industry, academia and other government agencies in research areas such as security management and assurance, cryptography and systems security, identity management, security automation, secure system. In addition, Donna guides programs to support both national and international security standards activities.
Cynthia E Irvine
Cynthia E Irvine 2015 Inductee for the
            Cyber Security Hall of Fame
Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at Naval Postgraduate School
A 2015 inductee into the Hall of Fame, Cynthia E. Irvine is a Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at the Naval Postgraduate School. Her research has focused on developmental security as applied to the creation of trustworthy systems, and more recently, on cyber operations. She is a champion of cyber security instruction designed to ensure that the foundational concepts of constructive cyber security are integrated into academic courses and curricula.

Through curriculum development, educational tools, the supervision of student research, and her professional activities, Dr. Irvine is a true leader in cyber security education.
Jim Bidzos
Jim Bidzos 2013 Inductee for the Cyber
                Security Hall of Fame
Jim Bidzos is CEO and Chairman of VeriSign, Inc
A 2013 inductee into the Hall of Fame, Jim Bidzos served as CEO of RSA Data Security from 1986 through 1999. Along with RSA co-founder and MIT professor Ron Rivest, Bidzos built RSA into the premier cryptography company in the 80s and 90s.

Bidzos formed Verisign in 1995 to provide trusted certificate authority services to a global market after pioneering the concept within RSA beginning in 1986.He also created the RSA Conference in 1991, and was the Chairman of the event until his retirement from that position in 2004.